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Intersection: Best of 2011

Can’t get enough of “Intersection?” This week listen back to the best of 2011

In an interview taped days before the shuttle program’s final launch in July Shuttle Launch Director Mike Leinbach reflects on the program’s end and what’s next for American space exploration. Governor Rick Scott discusses his wariness for accepting federal funds. Joe Kittinger, who holds the record for highest parachute jump, tells what it’s like to jump from the edge of space.

What were your favorite “Intersection” interviews of 2011? Listen to “Intersection” Tuesdays at 9:30 a.m. The show is rebroadcast Wednesdays at 6:30 p.m. and Saturdays at 7:30 a.m. Then let us know here on Florida Talks.

Keep listening in 2012 for fresh interviews.

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Year in Review Media Roundtable

We had a full slate of holiday cheer for our last day of 2011. We began today’s show with a special year in review version of our media roundtable as we looked back at the First Coast’s biggest stories. Joining to discuss such topics as the election of Mayor Alvin Brown, the Jaguars being purchased by businessman Shahid Khan, and the murder trial of 12 year Christian Fernandez were: Karen Brune Mathis, editor of the Financial News and Daily Record; Mary Kelli Palka, reporter for the Florida Times-Union; and WJCT’s own senior staff reporter Kevin Meerschaert.

We then got a special preview of the new season of the hit PBS show Antiques Roadshow as the show’s executive producer Marsha Bemko joined us by phone. The show’s 16th season begins in January, and features they’re most valuable treasure yet.

We heard from commentator Mary W. Bridgman about her family’s special holiday tradition.

And a group of famous First Coast voices brought us a special reading of Twas the Night Before Christmas. Listen to the podcast of today’s show to find out who lent their voice.

Wallet Doctor Ron Allen was in studio to give us some tips about the do’s and dont’s of purchasing timeshares.

And we closed out this final edition of First Coast Connect for 2011 in style with a preview of what’s happening around town in the next few weeks with Jacksonville Magazine’s Kerry Speckman.

If you missed any portion of today’s program, be sure to check out our podcasts at www.wjctondemand.org or listen to the replay of this program tonight at 8 pm on WJCT Arts.

You can join in on the discussion by clicking the add comment button. We value your feedback.

And from all of us here at First Coast Connect, happy holidays and happy new year!

Gulf Coast Live: Arts Edition – The A Cappella Group’s 4th Album / Under Azure Skies

Cypress Lake Center for the Arts fourth album from its very own The A Cappella Group features 10 songs.  We’ll hear from Quinton Thomas, who gives a soulful performance of Bruno Mars, Just The Way You Are and Diana Landa, bringing down the house with Breathe by Michelle Branch. Matching Voices was recorded in 43 hours over a three day weekend last May.

Plus Sarasota’s Bayfront Park is home to 10 new works of large-scale sculpture. The exhibit, titled “Under Azure Skies,” was curated by the Tennessee-based sculptor, John Henry. Most share the use of natural materials, evocative and iconic subject matter and an organic emphasis.

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Complexus by John Henry

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Crown by Douglas Schatz

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Squirt by John Clement

The show will be live at Noon on 90.1 FM
Call in: 1-877-428-8255
Email: gulfcoastlive@wgcu.org

Click here to go to the show’s page

Intersection: Casey Anthony prosecutor Jeff Ashton

Casey Anthony prosecutor Jeff Ashton says the sensational summertime murder trial was a good example of our criminal justice system.

“I mean, it is a good illustration of how the system works,” he says. “It’s a good illustration that even in cases where there is great public outcry that an acquittal is still possible. Even if I don’t agree with it, it’s good to know our system is not hijacked by the mob, as some people might think it is.”

The Anthony case was among Central Florida’s top stories of 2011, transfixing a country weary of economic woes as part murder mystery, part soap opera and part lesson in our criminal justice system. In the end Anthony was acquitted of the most serious charges against her, including first-degree murder, in the death of her 2-year-old daughter, Caylee.

This week on “Intersection” Anthony prosecutor Jeff Ashton discusses his new book, “Imperfect Justice: Prosecuting Casey Anthony.” He points to pretrial publicity and its influence on the jury as the primary reasons Anthony was acquitted. He says the state was embarrassed by conflicting reports on internet searches on the Anthony family computer.

He explains prosecutors declined to present more evidence on Anthony’s volatile relationship with her mother because much of it was hearsay and inadmissible at trial. He adds Florida’s liberal public records laws deserve a re-examination.

“I’m not too sure that releasing every page of 28,000 pages of documents is necessarily the best thing,” he says.

How do you think pretrial publicity influenced the Anthony trial? Tune into “Intersection” Tuesdays at 9:30 a.m. The show is rebroadcast Wednesdays at 6:30 p.m. and Saturdays at 7:30 a.m. Or listen online and weigh in here on Florida Talks.

Gulf Coast Live: Reefs at Risk

A study from the Global Coral Reef Monitoring Network finds that nearly 20 percent of the world’s coral reefs have been lost, with another 15 percent facing imminent peril in the next 10 to 20 years due to warming ocean temperatures, pollution and unsustainable fishing practices.  Meanwhile, researchers with the Nature Conservancy said earlier this month that in Florida waters damage from coral bleaching this past summer was the worst on record.

Coral get its vibrant colors from the complex set of organisms that make their homes in coral’s porous surface.  Bleaching occurs when the coral becomes sick and those organisms leave the coral exposing its stark white skeleton.  We’ll talk with scientists with the University of Florida and Mote Marine Laboratory about the ecological importance of coral reefs and their ongoing research efforts aimed at helping coral recover by staving off disease.

The show will be live at Noon on 90.1 FM
Call in: 1-877-428-8255
Email: gulfcoastlive@wgcu.org

Click here to go to the show’s page

Home for the Holidays Adoption Event on WJCT’s First Coast Connect

Nearly two dozen children were officially adopted in a special mass ceremony yesterday. It’s called “Home for the Holidays,” and it’s an annual event at the Duval County courthouse. How did this tradition begin and how do all of the different agencies that work with First Coast children help make it a reality? Welcomed Circuit Judge David Gooding and Tommy Barnett, who adopted a child yesterday, to the show to tell us more.

For many Americans, the most wonderful time of the year can instead be the most miserable. The holidays typically see higher than average suicide rates. With millions unemployed or struggling, the expectations of the holiday season as a magical time too often don’t match the reality. Dr. Dorree Lynn, psychologist and life coach based here on the First Coast, was in the studio to talk about what you can do to beat those holiday blues.

Florida Times-Union books page editor Brandy Hillboldt Allport joined us with a few gift suggestions for the reader in your life.

And finally it was Tech Tuesday on the show. We spoke to tech blogger Joey Marchy about the Stop Online Piracy Act.

If you missed any portion of today’s program, be sure to check out our podcasts at www.wjctondemand.org or listen to the replay of this program tonight at 8 pm on WJCT Arts.

You can join in on the discussion by clicking the add comment button. We value your feedback.

Gulf Coast Live: High School Students Living Abroad / Living and Learning with Dyslexia

Each summer a group of Southwest Florida High School students get the chance to spend seven weeks living abroad and learning what it’s like to live in a foreign country.  It’s an experiment in international living sponsored by the Naples Council on World Affairs.  We’ll meet some seniors from Collier County who spent the past summer living and working in Ghana, Botswana and Morocco.

We’ll find out how the experiences have expanded their world view, altered their perspectives and irrevocably changed their lives.  Plus, dyslexia is estimated to affect about 17 percent of Americans.  We’ll examine learning resources available to those with the developmental reading disorder through the non-profit Learning Ally.  We’ll also talk with a Southwest Florida student now studying pre-medicine in Miami to explore what it’s like to live with and overcome dyslexia.

The show will be live at Noon on 90.1 FM
Call in: 1-877-428-8255
Email: gulfcoastlive@wgcu.org

Click here to go to the show’s page